3 Containers and Brown Fruit

What do you do with Brown Fruit?

Save them, of course!

What do you do with brown fruit?

Save them for smoothies, stock or dessert by freezing them.

Reducing Food Waste in Your Home

Containers

Frugality and zero-waste often go in hand-in-hand. Unfortunately, my taste buds and my kids pickiness often work hard to overcome my desire to save food and eliminate extra waste. I pack lunches for my kids and every other day (consistency is not their strong point) I unpack those same lunches from their bags. The apples are brown and the carrots are hard. A whole week can go by with brown apples being unpacked from lunch boxes, when on the 8th day I don’t pack them apples the ensuing tantrums are vicious. So apples go in their lunch every day and very often come home brown.

The frugal side of me cringes if they go in the trash yet the picky side me refuses to eat them.

I have the same issue with soft vegetables, slightly browning bananas, mushy fruit and browning greens.

Freezing for Zero Waste

So I keep 3 Containers in my freezer. They basically live there.

  1. Stock
  2. Smoothies
  3. Apples.

Fruit and vegetables that are “gross” to me and my family (i.e. mushy, hard, brown) yet not moldy go into one of the 3 containers.

I have a container where I put my vegetable stock- leftover carrots, browning greens, etc go into this box. I also put carrot peels, the strings from my celery and other scraps. These sit in my freezer until I need a new chicken or vegetable stock. Occasionally I have to add some vegetables but more often than not, some water and these scraps make a delicious stock. I will buy some chicken necks or bones and make a flavorful chicken stock as well. These get frozen into individual containers and are the base of many soups, stews, sauces and other dishes. Low-sodium and basically free!

I love smoothies and they are a great snack. Frozen fruit can be really pricey though! Browning fruit go into a container just for that purpose. A lot of bananas end up there but sometimes berries, dates, kiwi, and pears go as well. When it’s time for a smoothie, I hack some pieces off, add a liquid and a green (basil or parsley) and a delicious smoothie is born. All made from items that may have ended up in the trash!

I don’t like apples in my smoothies but my kids love apples (sometimes). Browning apples get placed into their own container where I save them until I have enough for a cobbler, pie, apple sauce or apple cider. Fruits that would have been thrown in the trash are saved until they are useful once more. I actually made homemade apple butter once! It took forever and I don’t know if I would have the patience to do it again but it was delicious!

No More Guilt!

This system also assuages my guilt for not eating imperfect fruit (I am very picky to the taste and texture of my fruit and vegetables). It also helps me curb my inclination to buy less fruit and vegetables to have in the house. The frugal side of me has a hard time spending money on a variety of fruits and vegetables if I think it may not got eaten. But its really much better for myself and my children to have these options readily available for them to eat. By reducing the amount of food that goes to waste, I can feel comfortable by fresh fruits and vegetables because I know they will get used-even if its not in the original way intended.

Do you struggle with eating healthy on a budget? It doesn’t have to be difficult!

Feast on a Budget

Holiday on a Dime

How to Create a Feast on A Budget

Big family meals. Tables laden with food. Drinks flowing. Money being spent. It’s holiday season and a time for celebrating. But the holidays can be a stressful time if you are on a strict budget. When you are living very carefully on the money that you have, extra expenses can really be a struggle. There are some who go all-out on Thanksgiving and don’t really care to spend extra on this once-a-year occasions but remember that if you are putting money on a credit card to pay for your expenses you will regret it later on. You don’t want to be paying for your Thanksgiving meal in February. The best way to tackle the large expenses of the holiday season is to put aside money for holidays all year round. I have an “envelope” for holiday expenses which I try to fill every month. But even with saving, money is finite and holidays are expensive. So….

feast

7 tips to save a dime on your big holiday feasts:

  1. Serve soup. Starting a meal with a nice soup is a good way to fill up on something cheap and festive. You want your family and guests to fill up on the cheaper items first so that you can skimp on the more expensive stuff. Don’t get carried away and make a fancy, expensive soup with lots of ingredients! A simple cream of potato or zucchini soup is fitting start to an elegant meal but a very cheap and filling dish. Soup can also be easily frozen as leftovers (see #7).
  2. Serve bread and dips. A yummy (homemade) bread or rolls is a good, filling way to start the meal. Any plain bread recipe can be elevated with the addition of some roasted garlic or herbs. A simple tehina or hummus dip (can be homemade) to dip the bread in will get the meal started.
  3. Lighten up the sides. Many traditional side dishes are based on pretty cheap items- sweet potatoes, potatoes, stuffing etc. Cut down on the margarine, butter, salt and oil to make the vegetables less heavy. The cost savings may be minimal but the lighter version will be easier to swallow and will encourage guests to eat more of these vegetables. A light lettuce or tomato salad is another easy, cheap side dish.
  4. Shop around for the turkey and other main dishes. While it not exactly practical to shop around for the best deal on each ingredient- especially if you are cooking all week!- pick the most expensive or most used ingredient and find a deal on that. For thanksgiving, this will probably be the Turkey. If you save $1 dollar a pound on a ten-pound turkey, you will save $10. That is worth driving a little extra for! Keep an eye out for grocery stores offering coupons or deals on other more expensive ingredients like nuts, throughout the week.
  5. Cut down on drinks. Soda, punch, and juice add expense to your meal. Consider serving water or a homemade lemonade or sumac juice to cut down on costs and make your meal a little healthier. Some lemon slices or fresh mint in a pitcher of water make a festive addition to your table with very little cost.
  6. Sweet potato vs. pecan? While it may not be worth it for you to cut down on all expensive ingredients or dishes (Thanksgiving is one time a year, after all!) it may be worth it to cut down on the more expensive dishes on the menu. A smaller piece of pecan pie can be served next to a larger slice of sweet potato pie. The more expensive the ingredient- the more sparingly it should be used.
  7. Leftovers! It goes without saying (but we are saying it anyways)- save leftovers. Take the time after your exhausting day to properly pack up and fridge or freeze leftovers. Don’t leave all food to be eaten the next day. Freeze some dishes to keep for those days when supper is just not happening. Instead of ordering pizza, pull some leftovers out and you will be grateful you took the time to freeze it!

Do you have any tips to cut down on expenses for the big meal? Share on Twitter or leave a comment below!

If you need to save a dime while planning a meal you probably need to save more when grocery shopping. This one shopping hack will save you money at the grocery checkout.

Emergency Fund: A Primer

Everything you need to know about Emergency Funds

Why, What, Where and When

Background of Emergency Fund

  • 43.3% of Americans have less than $500 set aside for a financial emergency
  • 34.5% of Americans don’t have an emergency fund at all

and 14.5% of Americans don’t even know what an emergency fund is. (Source)

This post is dedicated to that 14.5%. You know who you are. Or maybe you don’t. But maybe you can read this post and then you can have the amazing honor of lowering that percentage. These types of statistics are what led me to start my blog.

Emergency Fund: A Primer

Emergency Fund:A Primer

What is an emergency fund?

Exactly what is sounds like. Basically its money that you put aside to help you cover emergencies

Why is this different than other savings?

Continue reading “Emergency Fund: A Primer”